Step 3

Identify the relevant information pertaining to your specific community (Treaty Territory, different First Nations language groups and natural environment including resources).

Here is an interactive map of Saskatchewan's Treaty Territories and large pdf map of Treaty Territories and reserves. This will help you identify and learn more about your own Treaty Territory and reserve(s) located closest to your school.
OTC Map of Saskatchewan

In Saskatchewan, the Treaty Territories are 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10. The following link provides a list of Treaties in Canada with a lot of helpful information and even more resources to use in the classroom.
List of Treaty Guides

The following link is a wealth of information pertaining solely to First Nations information in Saskatchewan. There is so much information here that it will take a long time to sift through, but if you cannot find something anywhere else, chances are it will be here.
Aboriginal (First Nations and Metis) Entry in the Encyclopedia of Saskatchewan

In terms of language groups in your area, here is a map of Saskatchewan with all of the First Nations Reserves pinpointed as clickable triangles. Upon clicking one of the triangles in your area, it will direct you to a Government of Saskatchewan page with the name and contact information of that reserve. Once you have identified the reserve(s) you can cross reference the name of the reserve(s) with the associated language group.
Map of Saskatchewan First Nations Reserves

Language Groups and Reserves Chart

These are lists of all of the reserves that fall under each major language groups.
Language_Reserves.jpg
Once you have identified your Treaty Territory, language group(s) and reserve(s) located closest to your school go to the following Saskatchewan Indian Cultural Centre website and do some research on the language group(s).Saskatchewan Indian Cultural Centre
On the website click on the language group you have identified.

Our Survey
As a group, we were wondering just how many of our colleagues attending the University of Regina knew some of the relevant information pertaining to First Nations information in our community. To find out what kind of information they knew, we conducted a small survey to a small group of 101 University students aged 18-50 attending second, third or fourth-year University courses in the Faculty of Education at the University of Regina. The survey contained a total of 7 questions: 2 of them were yes/no and 5 questions were right or wrong answers.

Here is a copy of the First Nations Classroom Content Knowledge and Implementation Survey itself so that you may use it to assess the knowledge of your students or colleagues.
First Nations Classroom Content Knowledge and Implementation Survey

Here is a link to the Survey results.



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